A possible correlation between the altitudinal and latitudinal ranges of species in the high elevation flora of the andes

Mary T. Kalin Arroyo, Leah S. Dudley, Patricio Pliscoff, Lohengrin A. Cavieres, Francisco A. Squeo, Clodomiro Marticorena, Ricardo Rozzi

Producción científica: Capítulo del libro/informe/acta de congresoCapítulorevisión exhaustiva

4 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

It is increasingly becoming recognized that the alpine life zone, defi ned as that vegetation occurring above the upper natural treeline on mountains (Körner, 2003), provides an impressive replicated, large-scale natural experiment, and thus an ideal system for studying macroecological patterns, and ecological and evolutionary processes. Although covering a relatively small proportion of the earth’s terrestrial area (ca. 3%) (Körner, 2003), alpine vegetation is amply represented in both hemispheres, where it is found on all continents, and globally extends from subpolar to equatorial latitudes. Alpine vegetation in many parts of the world, unlike much subtending lowland vegetation, is still relatively well conserved (cf. Nogués-Bravo et al., 2008), thus providing greater assurance that any broad patterns detected in the alpine will refl ect nonanthropogenic processes.

Idioma originalInglés
Título de la publicación alojadaData Mining for Global Trends in Mountain Biodiversity
EditorialCRC Press
Páginas29-38
Número de páginas10
ISBN (versión digital)9781420083705
ISBN (versión impresa)9781420083699
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 ene. 2009
Publicado de forma externa

Nota bibliográfica

Publisher Copyright:
© 2010 by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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