Measuring the quality of teaching practices in primary schools: Assessing the validity of the Teach observation tool in Punjab, Pakistan

Ezequiel Molina, Syeda Farwa Fatima, Andrew Dean Ho, Carolina Melo Hurtado, Tracy Marie Wilichowski, Adelle Pushparatnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monitoring the quality of teaching practices of primary school teachers in low-and-middle-income countries is often hampered by the lack of freely available classroom observation tools that are feasible to administer, validated in their own setting, and can be used as part of national monitoring systems. To address this discrepancy, Teach, an open-access classroom observation tool, was developed to measure the quality of teaching practices of primary school teachers in low-and-middle-income countries. This paper uses data from Punjab, Pakistan to evaluate the validity of Teach. Results show that Teach scores were internally consistent, presented good inter-rater reliability, and provided sufficient information to differentiate low from high-quality teaching practices. Further, higher Teach scores were associated with higher student outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103171
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume96
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was made possible by the World Bank's Systems Approach for Better Education (SABER) Trust Fund, which is supported by the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID) and Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). We are grateful to the many researchers, survey experts, and observers who supported the data collection effort and to all of the participating schools in Punjab, Pakistan. In particular, we'd like to thank the World Bank's Punjab SABER Service Delivery team, led by Koen Martijn Geven, and including Tazeen Fasih, Sarfraz Bhatti, Eema Masood, Abdal Mufti, Maria Qureshi, and Mahjabeen Raza. We are also grateful to Omar Arias, Luis Benveniste, Deon Filmer, and Halsey Rogers, who provided feedback on previous versions of this paper. Moreover, we'd like to thank the Teach Advisory Panel composed of Lindsay Brown, Pam Grossman, Heather Hill, Sara Rimm-Kaufman, Andrew Ragatz, Erica Woolway, and Nick Yoder for providing feedback during the development of the tool. Lastly, and most importantly, the team members would like to thank all the teachers who welcomed us into their classroom as part of this project. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), its affiliate organizations, the Executive Directors of the World Bank, or the governments they represent.

Funding Information:
This study was made possible by the World Bank’s Systems Approach for Better Education (SABER) Trust Fund, which is supported by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID) and Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). We are grateful to the many researchers, survey experts, and observers who supported the data collection effort and to all of the participating schools in Punjab, Pakistan. In particular, we’d like to thank the World Bank’s Punjab SABER Service Delivery team, led by Koen Martijn Geven, and including Tazeen Fasih, Sarfraz Bhatti, Eema Masood, Abdal Mufti, Maria Qureshi, and Mahjabeen Raza. We are also grateful to Omar Arias, Luis Benveniste, Deon Filmer, and Halsey Rogers, who provided feedback on previous versions of this paper. Moreover, we’d like to thank the Teach Advisory Panel composed of Lindsay Brown, Pam Grossman, Heather Hill, Sara Rimm-Kaufman, Andrew Ragatz, Erica Woolway, and Nick Yoder for providing feedback during the development of the tool. Lastly, and most importantly, the team members would like to thank all the teachers who welcomed us into their classroom as part of this project. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), its affiliate organizations, the Executive Directors of the World Bank, or the governments they represent.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020

Keywords

  • Education
  • Education policy and planning
  • Public service delivery
  • Teacher performance
  • Teacher training

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