Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein, fetal middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity and fetal haemoglobin in pregnancies at risk of fetal anaemia

Jose L. Bartha, Sebastian Illanes, Sherif A. Abdel-Fattah, Gayle Harrison, Peter W. Soothill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the relationships between maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) levels and both middle cerebral artery (MCA) peak systolic velocity and fetal haemoglobin in women at risk of fetal anaemia. Methods: Forty-one measurements of MSAFP were carried out in 22 women at risk of fetal anaemia (16 alloimmunised patients and 6 cases of parvovirus infection) who were monitored by using MCA Doppler measurements. The relationships between MSAFP (MoM) and both MCA peak systolic velocity (z-scores) and fetal haemoglobin (MoM) were studied. Results: There were significant correlations between MSAFP and both MCA Doppler measurements (r = 0.56, p = 0.00017) and fetal haemoglobin (n = 13, r = -0.71, p = 0.006). MSAFP was higher in cases with fetal anaemia (n = 10) than in those with normal haemoglobin levels (n = 3) (1.7 ± 0.4 vs 0.8 ± 0.1 MoM; p = 0.006). In cases of alloimmunised pregnancies with fetal anaemia, MSAFP elevations preceded the presence of increased MCA Doppler velocity by 2.7 weeks (range 0-9 weeks). Conclusion: MSAFP is significantly correlated with both MCA Doppler measurements and fetal haemoglobin. Elevations of MSAFP may appear earlier than MCA Doppler abnormalities in cases of fetal anaemia associated with red blood cell alloimmunisation. Copyright
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)101-104
Number of pages4
JournalPrenatal Diagnosis
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alpha-fetoprotein
  • Fetal anaemia
  • MCA Doppler
  • Parvovirus infection
  • Rhesus disease

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