Long-Term, Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome-Like Condition Is Associated with Higher Metabolism, Reduced Synaptic Plasticity and Cognitive Impairment in Octodon degus

Daniela S. Rivera*, Carolina B. Lindsay, Juan F. Codocedo, Laura E. Carreño, Daniel Cabrera, Marco A. Arrese, Carlos P. Vio, Francisco Bozinovic, Nibaldo C. Inestrosa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

There has been a progressive increase in the incidence of fructose-induced metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome (MetS). Moreover, novel evidence reported negative effects of high-fructose diets in brain function. This study was designed to evaluate for the first time the effects of long-term fructose consumption (LT-FC) on the normal ageing process in a long-lived animal model rodent, Octodon degus or degu. Moreover, we could replicate human sugar consumption behaviour over time, leading us to understand then the possible mechanisms by which this MetS-like condition could affect cognitive abilities. Our results support that 28 months (from pup to adulthood) of a 15% solution of fructose induced clinical conditions similar to MetS which includes an insulin-resistance scenario together with elevated basal metabolic rate and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Additionally, we extended our analysis to evaluate the impact of this MetS-like condition on the functional and cognitive brain processes. Behavioural test suggests that fructose-induced MetS-like condition impair hippocampal-dependent and independent memory performance. Moreover, we also reported several neuropathological events as impaired hippocampal redox balance, together with synaptic protein loss. These changes might be responsible for the alterations in synaptic plasticity and transmitter release observed in these cognitively impaired animals. Our results indicate that LT-FC induced several facets of MetS that eventually could trigger brain disorders, in particular, synaptic dysfunction and reduced cognition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9169-9187
Number of pages19
JournalMolecular Neurobiology
Volume55
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Basal metabolic rate
  • Behaviour performance
  • Fructose
  • Insulin resistance
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver
  • Octodon degus
  • Synaptic plasticity

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