Conocer el alcance de la enfermedad meningocócica en América Latina

Translated title of the contribution: Knowing the scope of meningococcal disease in Latin America

Marco A.P. Sáfadi*, María Teresa Valenzuela, Ana Flavia Carvalho, Lúcia Helena de Oliveira, David M. Salisbury, Jon Kim Andrus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Opportunities for strengthening surveillance of meningococcal disease exist between and within countries in Latin America. In August of 2015, a workshop was convened in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, to address the following objectives: 1) to review meningococcal disease burden and vaccine use in Latin America; 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of current meningococcal surveillance practices in the region; 3) to identify challenges to meningococcal surveillance in the region; and 4) to outline steps for strengthening meningococcal surveillance and disease control in the region. Based on the workshop's discussions, recommendations for strengthening surveillance and controlling meningococcal disease in Latin America focus on improving: a) laboratory capabilities for diagnostic testing; b) communication regarding epidemiologic- and laboratory-based analyses; c) communication during outbreaks; d) monitoring of long-term disease outcomes; e) knowledge of vaccines against serogroup B disease; and f) criteria for defining and controlling meningococcal outbreaks. Overall, improving surveillance will help guide strategies for meningococcal disease prevention and control in Latin America.

Translated title of the contributionKnowing the scope of meningococcal disease in Latin America
Original languageSpanish
Article numbere118
JournalRevista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health
Volume41
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Pan American Health Organization. All rights reserved.

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