Is the use of a potassium nitrate dentifrice effective in reducing tooth sensitivity related to in-office bleaching? A randomized triple-blind clinical trial

María Gracia Ortega-Moncayo, Paulina Aliaga-Sancho, Camilo Pulido, Mario Felipe Gutierrez, Estuardo Rodriguez-Salazar, Adrieli Burey, Katherine León, Yolanda Román-Oñate, Cesar Augusto Galvao Arrais, Alessandro D. Loguercio, Andrés Dávila-Sánchez*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the use of a dentifrice containing 5% potassium nitrate (KNO3) prior to and during in-office dental bleaching reduces bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity and affects bleaching efficiency. Materials and methods: Thirty-eight individuals were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 19). The experimental group performed toothbrushing using a dentifrice containing 5% KNO3, one week before treatment and before the first and second bleaching sessions. In the control group, a placebo dentifrice without KNO3 was applied as described for the first group. Tooth sensitivity was recorded on visual analog scales (VAS) and numeric rating scales (NRS) immediately and up to 48 h after bleaching sessions. Color change at different time intervals, was evaluated with shade guide units (∆SGU) and a digital spectrophotometer (∆E CIELab 1976 and CIEDE2000) at baseline and 7, 15, and 30 days post-bleaching. Mann–Whitney test and t-test were used to evaluate TS intensity for NRS and VAS scales, respectively, and T-test was used for color difference evaluation. Results: No significant difference in tooth sensitivity's absolute risk and intensity were observed between tested groups in any evaluated treatment time for NRS (p = 0.91) or VAS scales (p = 0.48). T-test showed no significant difference in both ∆E and ∆SGU tooth color among the experimental and control groups during the different evaluation times (p = 0.27). Conclusion: The use of a dentifrice containing 5% KNO3 does not prevent post-operatory tooth sensitivity but allows the same whitening efficiency as a regular dentifrice. Clinical significance: The use of a dentifrice-containing KNO3 did not prevent bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity when high-concentrated hydrogen peroxide was used for in-office bleaching.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Keywords

  • hydrogen peroxide
  • potassium nitrate
  • sensitivity
  • spectrophotometer

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