How do laryngeal and respiratory functions contribute to differentiate actors/actresses and untrained voices?

Suely Master, Marco Guzman, Maria Josefina Azócar, Daniel Muñoz, Cori Bortnem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The present study aimed to compare actors/actresses's voices and vocally trained subjects through aerodynamic and electroglottographic (EGG) analyses. We hypothesized that glottal and breathing functions would reflect technical and physiological differences between vocally trained and untrained subjects. Methods Forty participants with normal voices participated in this study (20 professional theater actors and 20 untrained participants). In each group, 10 male and 10 female subjects were assessed. All participants underwent aerodynamic and EGG assessment of voice. From the Phonatory Aerodynamic System, three protocols were used: comfortable sustained phonation with EGG, voice efficiency with EGG, and running speech. Contact quotient was calculated from EGG. All phonatory tasks were produced at three different loudness levels. Mean sound pressure level and fundamental frequency were also assessed. Univariate, multivariate, and correlation statistical analyses were performed. Results Main differences between vocally trained and untrained participants were found in the following variables: mean sound pressure level, phonatory airflow, subglottic pressure, inspiratory airflow duration, inspiratory airflow, and inspiratory volume. These variables were greater for trained participants. Mean pitch was found to be lower for trained voices. Conclusions The glottal source seemed to have a weak contribution when differentiating the training status in speaking voice. More prominent changes between vocally trained and untrained participants are demonstrated in respiratory-related variables. These findings may be related to better management of breathing function (better breath support).
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)333-345
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Actors
  • Actresses
  • Contact quotient
  • Glottal airflow
  • Subglottic pressure
  • Voice training

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