Gestión del riesgo de incendio en Hispanoamérica y Filipinas: Reformas urbanas, medidas normativas y circulación de saberes (siglos XV-XIX)

Translated title of the contribution: Fire management in Hispanic America and Philippines: Urban reforms, regulatory measures, and circulation of knowledge (15th - 19th centuries)

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The risk management policies of the Hispanic authorities in the peninsular and American territories aims to reduce the presence of fires can be considered an almost unexplored field of institutional and legal historiography. Bases on some examples this article wants to provide a first overview of the urban reforms and regulatory measures that allowed the authorities to mediate and to intervene on the urban structure to reduce the vulnerability to fire of Hispanic American cities, regulating or abolishing all behaviors considered fire risk producers, and warning the population regarding the importance of not use fire recklessly and negligently. Work that was complemented, from the end of the 18th century, with the studies and manuscripts of "police and hygiene" regarding the reduction of fire risk, which circulated in the Hispanic sphere, and were transferred in rules and regulations adopted in various spaces of the Hispanic Monarchy, examining in this occasion, the specific cases of Cuba and Philippines.

Translated title of the contributionFire management in Hispanic America and Philippines: Urban reforms, regulatory measures, and circulation of knowledge (15th - 19th centuries)
Original languagePortuguese
Pages (from-to)11-39
Number of pages29
JournalMemorias
Issue number45
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Universidad del Norte. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Fires
  • Hispanic monarchy
  • Risk management
  • Social discipline
  • Urban reforms

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