Effects of bromocriptine in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

Fernando Figueroa E*, Flavio Carrión A, María Eugenia Martínez R, Santiago Rivero D, Iván Mamani V, Gilberto González V

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Neuroendocrine factors play an important role in the expression of autoimmune diseases. Prolactin (PRL) can induce T-cell proliferation and macrophage activation. Elevated PRL levels have been described in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Aim and Methods: We studied immunological and clinical effects of PRL suppression in 9 RA patients with active disease, treated for 3 months with bromocriptine (BRC), an inhibitor of PRL secretion. Results: BRC induced a significant depression of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells response to antigen (p=0.008) and mitogen (p=0.008) which was significantly correlated with improvements in the HAQ disability index (r=0.68; p=0.04) and grip strength (r=0.7; p=0.02). Also, the in-vitro production of IL-2, nitric oxide and poliamines -that are critical for the proliferative response of lymphoid cells- decreased significantly. The group experienced significant improvement of grip strength (p=0.028) and the HAQ disability index (p=0.025), whereas 4 individuals achieved clinical improvement according to the American College of Rheumatology preliminary definition. We conclude that BRC treatment induces a significant depression of in-vitro immune function in RA patients and that these changes are related to parameters of disease activity. The effects of BRC on immune function and disease activity in RA patients warrant further investigation.

Translated title of the contributionEffects of bromocriptine in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)33-41
Number of pages9
JournalRevista Medica de Chile
Volume126
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1998

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