Education and income: Which is more important for mental health?

R. Araya, G. Lewis, G. Rojas, R. Fritsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

122 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study objective: To assess which indicators of socioeconomic status are associated with an increased prevalence of common mental disorders. Design: Cross sectional household survey. Setting: Santiago, Chile. Participants: Random sample of adults aged 16-65 residing in private households. Main results: Less education (odds ratio 2.44, 95% confidence intervals 1.50 to 3.97), a recent income decrease (odds ratio 2.14, 1.70 to 2.70), and poor housing (odds ratio 1.53, 1.05 to 2.23), were the only socioeconomic status variables that remained significantly associated with an increased prevalence of common mental disorders after adjustments. The prevalence of common mental disorders was also higher among people with manual unskilled occupations, overcrowded housing, and lower per capita income but these associations disappeared after adjustment for other explanatory and confounding variables. Conclusions: There is a strong, inverse, and independent association between education and common mental disorders. However, income was not associated with the prevalence of common mental disorders, after adjusting for other socioeconomic variables. Similar results have been found in other Latin American studies but British studies tend to find the opposite, that income but not education is associated with common mental disorders. Understanding the impact of socioeconomic factors on mental health requires research in poor as well as rich countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-505
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume57
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Education and income: Which is more important for mental health?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this