Acceptability and feasibility of “Yo Sé Lo Que Quiero” Program aiming to prevent substance use among vulnerable adolescents in Chile: A pilot Study.

Gabriel Salgado, Sofía Gana, Daniela Valenzuela, Saray Ramirez, Ricardo Araya, Jorge Gaete*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The use of substances of abuse in adolescents is a public health problem, both because of its prevalence and consequences. Objectives: i) To develop a culturally adapted version of the Unplugged program in Chile, renamed Yo Sé Lo Que Quiero (YSLQQ), for substance use prevention; ii) To evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of its implementation. Method: Pilot study, with randomized controlled trial design, with two arms (Intervention Group, IG; and Control Group, CG). The sample consisted of 1,556 students from 6th to 8th grade from six schools (1:1 ratio) in Santiago, Chile. The IG received the 12 sessions of the YSLQQ program and the CG the usual substance use prevention activities. Acceptability was assessed through a student questionnaire, and feasibility through teacher self-report. Results: More than half of the students reported that they liked the sessions. 61.3% were satisfied with the duration of the program and 61.7% with the activities. Some 68% agree that the program helped them to have more refusal skills towards tobacco, alcohol and drug use in the future. On the other hand, in relation to feasibility, 88.9% of the teachers remained faithful to the manual and 91.6% of the activities were fulfilled according to the manual. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that “Yo Sé Lo Que Quiero” program is acceptable and feasible for future implementation in adolescents.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalPilot and Feasibility Studies
StateIn preparation - 1 Jul 2021

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